How to Survive Postpartum Insomnia and Avoid Sleepless Nights?

Postpartum insomnia is a very serious health condition, it is a common sleep disorder that is often characterized by difficulty falling asleep, difficulty staying asleep, waking up too early, poor quality sleep, and a lot of sleepless nights in the fourth trimester.

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Harleen Kaur
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The Impact of Postpartum Insomni

How to Survive Postpartum Insomnia and Avoid Sleepless Nights?

Sleep loss is a common, normal experience after the arrival of a baby. But if you develop difficulty falling asleep or returning to sleep,  even after several weeks of delivery, you must be having postpartum insomnia.

Postpartum insomnia is a very serious health condition, it is a common sleep disorder that is often characterized by difficulty falling asleep, difficulty staying asleep, waking up too early, and/or non-restorative/poor quality sleep, a lot of sleepless nights". It can be harmful to the mother and affect her infant, partner, and other small children in the home. Research has suggested a link between the mother's emotional well-being and behavioral health and the physiological development of her child.


Postpartum insomnia is commonly experienced in the fourth trimester and is caused by a variety of factors such as anemia, hormonal changes, physical changes, mood disorders, and changes to the sleep schedule.


The Impact of Postpartum Insomnia on Mothers:

The Impact of Postpartum Insomnia on Mothers.

Sleep deprivation is a common consequence of postpartum insomnia and can have profound physical and emotional effects on new mothers. It can be harmful to the mother and affect her infant, partner, and other small children in the home. Research has suggested a link between the mother's emotional well-being and behavioral health and the physiological development of her child.

Physical Effects: Sleep deprivation takes a toll on a mother's physical well-being. Lack of quality sleep can lead to fatigue, reduced energy levels, and difficulties in recovering from childbirth. The body's ability to heal and rejuvenate is compromised when sleep is inadequate. Mothers may also experience increased pain sensitivity and a weakened immune system, making them more susceptible to illnesses.

Emotional Effects: Postpartum insomnia not only affects the body but affects emotionally. The hormonal changes that occur after childbirth, coupled with sleep deprivation, can contribute to mood swings, irritability, and feelings of overwhelm.  Postpartum insomnia has also been linked to an increased risk of developing postpartum depression or anxiety disorders.

Challenges in Caring for a Newborn: Caring for a newborn requires immense physical and emotional energy, which becomes even more challenging when a mother is experiencing sleep disturbances. Sleep deprivation can make it harder to concentrate, make decisions, and bond with the baby.  

How to Survive Postpartum Insomnia and Avoid Sleepless Nights?

The Impact of Postpartum Insomni

Nap When Baby Naps

This is a tried-and-true piece of advice, and it applies to insomnia as well. To the best of your ability, get sleep where you can. While it can be difficult to get a few winks at the same time as your baby, make sure you put yourself in the right environment for it.Practice stress-relieving techniques, such as breath focus, meditation, or yoga, to help you relax before bed.  Put your electronics away and resist the urge to check your phone within the 30 minutes leading up to bedtime. Even if you don't feel tired, try to get around eight hours of sleep every night.


Recommended Reading: Deep breathing techniques for Mental  Wellness and Stress Relief


Take your vitamins and dietry supplements:

Vitamins are essential for many processes in the body and help your brain function optimally. Include vitamin B, folic acid, niacin, pantothenic acid, biotin, and choline which may help with postpartum sleep. Postpartum moms, especially those who are breastfeeding, have increased nutritional needs. Not getting the proper nutrients can cause physical and mental distress, leading to difficulty sleeping. So have your dietry supplements.

 Eat well and Avoid alcohol and caffeine.

A nutritious diet rich in protein, vitamins, and minerals can help your body recover from giving birth so you feel better. Consume plenty of vegetables, fruits, whole grains, lean meats, fish, nuts, and seeds. Avoid sugary junk food and carbonated drinks to keep yourself hydrated.  If you have insomnia, a little food in your stomach may help you sleep. Drinking some milk may help, too. But keep the snack small. A heavy meal will tax your digestive system, making you uncomfortable and unable to get your 

Eat Magnesium and Iron rich food:

Try eating foods high in magnesium, iron, and calcium (such as bananas and milk, respectively). Magnesium relaxes muscles, while calcium helps the body produce melatonin and Melatonin aids in sound sleep. Try eating almonds, walnuts, chamomile tea. 


  • An ounce of almonds also provides 25% of the daily manganese needs for men and 31% of the daily manganese needs for women.
  • A study found that women who drank chamomile tea for 2 weeks reported improved sleep quality compared to non-tea drinkers.
  • Some researchers claim that eating walnuts improves sleep quality, as they’re one of the best food sources of melatonin.

Go for a morning walk: After a sleepless night carrying for their infant, mothers can recharge a bit by taking a stroll that morning. Exposure to natural sunlight can realign the circadian rhythm, which is normally calibrated with the rise and fall of the sun. Moderate exercise can also help them sleep more soundly the following night.

 Practise Controlled breathing, meditation, and other relaxation techniques may help people unwind in the evening and fall back asleep if they wake up during the night. Any kind of cognitive-behavioral therapy or meditation could help your brain relax, hence improves your sleep and cure your postpartum insomnia.


Recommended reading: Breathe, Mama, Breathe: Benefits of Deep Breathing for New Moms


Remember, New mothers, should always speak to a doctor before taking prescription or over-the-counter sleep medications or anti-depressants and inquire about concerns for their own health and their infant’s.

LOVE AND SUPPORT ALWAYS...!!

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